Sinking of the Lusitania

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The German Embassy attempted to place ads in 50 newspapers warning that the Lusitania was a target of war, but the U.S. government prevented them from being printed except for this one which was run in the Des Moines Register.

G. Edward Griffin / <cite>The Creature From Jekyll Island</cite>

The controversy over the ships cargo was finally resolved in 2008 when drivers moved inside the Lusitania's hull and found millions of rounds of military ammunition. Sam Greenhill, writing for Mail Online, reported:

[...] Germans had been right all along in claiming the ship was carrying war materials and was a legitimate military target.... The diving team estimates that around four million round of U.S.-manufactured Remington .303 bullets lie in the Lusitania's hold at a depth of 300 ft.

G. Edward Griffin / <cite>The Creature From Jekyll Island</cite>

Quickly after the explosion of the impact, there was a second and much larger explosion that literally blew the side off of cargo hold number two and started the great ship immediately toward the bottom. And what a hold it must have been. The Lusitania, one of the largest ships ever built, sank in less than eighteen minutes.

G. Edward Griffin / <cite>The Creature From Jekyll Island</cite>

The German navy was goaded into a position of shoot-first and ask questions later and, under those conditions, it was inevitable that American lives would be lost.

G. Edward Griffin / <cite>The Creature From Jekyll Island</cite>

The Lusitania and the Mauretania were built by Cunard and became major competitors of the Morgan cartel. It is an interesting footnote of history, therefore, that, from the Morgan perspective, the Lusitania was quite dispensable.

G. Edward Griffin / <cite>The Creature From Jekyll Island</cite>

Lord Mersey was put in charge of an official inquiry into the sinking of the Lusitania. It was not an investigation but a coverup. He was instructed by the Admiralty to place the entire blame on the Captain of the ship. Mersey obeyed his orders but refused payment for his services and declined to accept further judicial assignments. In later years, he said the affair "was a damn dirty business."

G. Edward Griffin / <cite>The Creature From Jekyll Island</cite>

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