Set

New Post

Quotes (9)

Lucifer is, however, not the same thing as Satan. The word Satan simply meant "one who tempts" and it merely referred to any contradicting, skeptical, or accusatory agent and their argument. Within holy orders, like the Essenes and Gnostics, a "Satan" was any detractor or opposition party. There was nothing supernatural about a Satan. There is little doubt that the term and concept has its origins in the Egyptian god Set, the opposer of Horus his twin. To oppose any hegemony is, therefore, to be "Satanic." So we see that there is a big difference between Satan and Lucifer. Lucifer was originally based upon the pagan god Mars and, eventually, Satan also became identified with the red fiery planet and its astrological energy. In the bible we have Jesus turning to Peter saying "get thee behind me Satan." If we accept Jesus to be the sun then we can take this statement to be of Astro-Theological significance. Mars occasionally rises heliacally, that is, with or even before the sun. The priests of the sun would exclaim from their temples "get thee down" or "get thee below" or "get thee behind Satan," in order not to have their deity be ousted, rivaled, and outshone.

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 2</cite>

The Red Cross - seen on the flag of St. George, the Ulster flag, and Union Jack of England, has a very old history going back to Egypt and the worship of the god Set who was connected with the colors red and blue. An ancient name for Egypt was Mori, and the hieroglyphic for this word featured a circle and cross identical to those seen on many flags and emblems of the world, particularly those of Britain. The word Mor or Mer, also referred directly to the Giza Pyramid and to the keepers of the knowledge of the pyramid. Therefore, it is a word that connects to secret societies and their knowledge (for example Merovingian).

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 2</cite>

Egyptologists have been conspicuously reticent to say what god or gods the Hyksos really worshipped. As we have already mentioned, we are told they were predominantly venerators of the god Set.

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 2</cite>

When the Hebrews emigrated from Egypt during the 19th Dynasty...they took with them the caricature of Set: Satan

Murray Hope / <cite>Temple of Set (quoted by Michael Tsarion)</cite>

Many scholars have agreed that the story of the combat between Horus and Set encapsulates the historical antipathy and tribulations between the native Egyptians and Hyksos invaders. In this case it is not that Set was evil but that he was the god adopted by the evil ones who chose to worship him. This is why Set would have been deemed a god of darkness in the age after the Hyksos were defeated and removed from power. Since Set opposed Osiris and Horus, the gods of light, scholars question why the Hyksos and Levites of the Solar Cult worshipped him. The answer has to do with the metaphysical properties of light. Set represented the dark side of the sun and of light. But he was a solar god nevertheless. Egyptian pantheons were dualistic and balanced. There were gods of light and gods of darkness. There were gods of the overworld and the underworld, of this world and of the next. In Egyptian, Set's name is believed to mean "great in strength." The Egyptian word setam meant "hate" and "opposition," while the word shetam meant "fight." In any case, he is one of Egypt’s oldest deities, worshipped centuries before the Hyksos arrived. Indeed, it is possibly due to Set's eventual connection with the hated Hyksos that he was not completely assimilated into the pantheon of Egyptian gods but always regarded as a god apart from the main pantheon. Finally, after the Hyksos Kings had been expelled, Set was considered the god of evil or, more specifically, of the evil ones. In fact, the true god of evil in Egypt was not Set but Apep or, more correctly, Apophis. This serpentine god ruled the underworld and hindered the god Ra when he attempted to traverse the forbidding regions of the nekyia. The protector of the sun god was none other than Set who attacked and overcame the demonic Apophis. So it is clear to students of Egyptian occultism that Set was not an easily defined one-dimensional god.To some minds he is evil and to others a god possessed of abilities that keep true evil at bay. Set was often depicted kneeling and we get the English words set and seat from this name. Something about Set reminds us of the Hindu god Shiva.

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 2</cite>

Set has been considered the Egyptian equivalent of the Christian Satan, though we stress that Set was a much more complex archetype than the Christian version.

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 2</cite>

Lord Set - An ancient god of the earth, akin to the Irish stag god Herne, and Hindu Shiva. His color was red and men will still say they "saw red" after becoming enraged. The red cross of England comes from his worship as do the many other "red" insignias to be found employed by governments and religious bodies. The red squares on the chess board represent the red desert lands of Egypt burned by the sun. These were the lands ruled over by Set

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 2</cite>

In any case, Set was considered a scheming deity who sought to overthrow the reign and sovereignty of his brother Osiris. After Set murdered Osiris he was sought out by Horus (the son of Osiris and Isis) who wounded him in the groin with a spear. Set managed to spear out one of Horus’ eyes but was ultimately overthrown by the god of light.

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 2</cite>

Some scholars imagine the Hyksos to have been horseback riding Hittites while others deem them Greeks, Syrians, Amorites, Minoans, Scythians, Hurrians, or even Trojans. One fact that suggests that the Hyksos were long term inhabitants of Egypt, rather than invaders, is their veneration of the ancient god Set (Seth, Sutekh, Seteh, or Seb) who had dominion over Lower (Northern) Egypt. During the time of the Hyksos, Set became part of the Heliopolitan Ennead. Set was god of the dark places, wild weather, and of the inhospitable red desert burned by the sun called Tesherit. This word means "red lands." Red was the color of Set, so it is interesting that this color should be frequently and conspicuously employed by corporations and governments (red squares, St. George's Red Cross, Red Coats, red tape, red carpets, red ribbons, red military stripes and lapels, red roses, etc). Some researchers point to this as evidence that the Hyksos were fair-complexioned westerners known as "Edomites."

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 2</cite>

Site Statistics

Posts
48,602
Comments
31,953
Members
26,150