Great Flood

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Research since the 1970s suggests that there were three global super-floods: 15,000 to 14,000 years ago; 12,000 to 11,000 years ago; and 8,000 to 7,000 years ago. The second period ties in with the date Plato ascribed in the Timaeus and Critias to the destruction by earthquakes and flooding of Atlantis, and with the Tamil myth of the submerging of the fabled land of Kumari Kandam. There is also strong evidence that nearly half the total melt water released at the end of the last Ice Age was concentrated into these three relatively short periods. Such events would have had a momentous impact on the human inhabitants at that time, leaving a marked impression on oral tradition, the original transmitter of all ancient myths

Harry Young / <cite>Bridging the Myth and Science of the Flood (quoted by Michael Tsarion)</cite>

Old Testament writers copied other details of the ancient flood myth but could not allow their god to be punished by the Great Whore of Babylon, as if he were a naughty child sent to bed without supper by an angry mother. Thus, they transformed Ishtar's rainbow barrier into a "sign of the covenant" voluntarily set in the heavens by God himself (Genesis 9:13).

Barbara G. Walker / <cite>The Woman&#039;s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets</cite>

The biblical flood story, the "deluge," was a late offshoot of a cycle of flood myths known everywhere in the ancient world. Thousands of years before the Bible was written, an ark was built by Sumerian Ziusudra. In Akkad, the flood hero's name was Atrakhasis. In Babylon he was Uta-Napishtim, the only mortal to become immortal. In Greece he was Deucalion, who repopulated the earth after the waters subsided, with the help of his wife Pyrrha and the advice of the Great Goddess of the waters, Themis. In Armenia, the hero was Xisuthros—a corruption of Sumerian Ziusudra—whose ark landed on Mount Ararat.

Barbara G. Walker / <cite>The Woman&#039;s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets</cite>

[...] "historical" civilizations first arose as remnants of older ones obliterated by these terrible upheavals

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 1</cite>

Studies have shown that at 10,178 BC, or over 12,000 years ago, the Celestial Pole was inclined at an angle of 30 degrees from its present position. This in turn strongly suggests that the terrestrial axis then oriented differently from today

Allan and Delair / <cite>When the Earth Nearly Died</cite>

Beaumont emphasized the swiftness of the catastrophic events, and it is this belief in the rapidity of the spectacle that separates Catastrophists from Uniformitarians

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 1</cite>

The magnitude of the biological extinctions achieved by the Deluge almost transcends the imagination. It annihilated literally billions of biological units of both sexes and every age indiscriminately. Only incredibly powerful flood waters operating world-wide could have achieved such results, and only a flood produced by the means previously suggested could have operated globally

Allan and Delair / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 1</cite>

The great flood (for there were many lesser ones) of ancient myth was but one symptom of the global cataclysm.

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 1</cite>

Research since the 1970s suggests that there were three global super-floods: 15,000 to 14,000 years ago; 12,000 to 11,000 years ago; and 8,000 to 7,000 years ago. The second period ties in with the date Plato ascribed in the Timaeus and Critias to the destruction by earthquakes and flooding of Atlantis, and with the Tamil myth of the submerging of the fabled land of Kumari Kandam. There is also strong evidence that nearly half the total meltwater released at the end of the last Ice Age was concentrated into these three relatively short periods. Such events would have had a momentous impact on the human inhabitants at that time, leaving a marked impression on oral tradition, the original transmitter of all ancient myths

Harry Young / <cite>Bridging the Myth and Science of the Flood (quoted by Michael Tsarion)</cite>

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