Goddess

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Probing ancient views of the Goddess is instructive. It shows a female figure almost always more powerful than the male. Not only is she his Mother, the author of his being; she is also the deity who infuses all creation with the vital blood of life. Gods prosper only when they partake of her wisdom or adopt her powers, until they commit the ultimate hubris, symbolic matricide, by setting up an all-masculine theology. The strength of the Goddess was harnessed to support new male religions as the strength of women's nurturing, caretaking instinct was harnessed to a patriarchal marriage system supporting men. Even today, scholars tend to call all ancient deities "gods" when they include both male and female; and sometimes the oracular utterances of the Goddess are said to emanate from a "god."

Barbara G. Walker / <cite>The Woman&#039;s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets</cite>

Male writers through the centuries broke the Goddess figure down into innumerable "goddesses," using different titles or names she received from different peoples at different times. If such a system had been applied to the usual concept of God, there would now be a multitude of separate "gods" with names like Almighty, Yahweh, Lord, Holy Ghost, Sun of Righteousness, Christ, Creator, Lawgiver, Jehovah, Providence, Allah, Savior, Redeemer, Paraclete, Heavenly Father, and so on, ad infinitum, each one assigned a particular function in the world pantheon. During the Middle Ages, most of the old names and titles of male deities were amalgamated as "secret names" of the one God, while the names and titles of the Goddess were ever more minutely classified, and some were even masculinized, humanized, or diabolized. Yet such classification tends to disintegrate under deeper study that reveals the same archetypal characteristics in nearly all the "goddesses."

Barbara G. Walker / <cite>The Woman&#039;s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets</cite>

Few words are so revealing of western sexual prejudice as the word Goddess, in contrast to the word God. Modern connotations vastly differ from those of the ancients, to whom the Goddess was a full-fledged cosmic parent figure who created the universe and its laws, ruler of Nature, Fate, Time, Eternity, Truth, Wisdom, Justice, Love. Birth, Death, etc.

Barbara G. Walker / <cite>The Woman&#039;s Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets</cite>

Like the Greeks, the Egyptians and Druids personified wisdom as a goddess. To the Greeks she was Sophia (a word meaning "serpent"), and to the Egyptians she was Ma'at, Nuith, or Taurt.

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 1</cite>

From birth to death the goddess played a part in the lives of the nobility of Ireland and Egypt. She played no active part in the lives of the Israelites of the bible.

Michael Tsarion / <cite>The Irish Origins of Civilization, Volume 1</cite>

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